Summary

Many journalists, at some point in their careers, have had an “Ah-hah!” moment -- a sudden realization about the impact of their work or the work of their colleagues. Many of the journalists interviewed for the WNN report provided a single anecdote about an event that helped them understand and appreciate the power and purpose of journalism. We are sharing those epiphanies here.

Click on the photos to view each anecdote.

Interviews 51 - 60 of 117 BACK  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  NEXT Page size:  10 | 20 | 50
Ephiphany photo

Dennis Fujimoto

Photographer / Reporter / Columnist, The Garden Island
Lihue, HI

Dennis Fujimoto began his professional journalism career shooting photos for TV Guide. To conquer his timidity, a veteran reporter taught him to remember he was just as good as his subjects when he shot their pictures. Then he turned that around, and he learned to treat everyone he shot as if they were a “cover person” – an attitude that acknowledges the abiding impact of putting a picture in the paper.

Ephiphany photo

Richard Stein

Graphics / IT / Web Supervisor, The Garden Island
Lihue, HI

Richard Stein experienced a special dimension of journalism’s power in a rodeo ring in Pendleton, Ore. He was videotaping the annual rodeo for his newspaper’s website when he realized he was an eyewitness to once-in-a -lifetime events -- events he could share with his community through journalism.

Ephiphany photo

Nathan Eagle

Managing Editor, The Garden Island
Lihue, HI

Nathan Eagle learned one of his first key lessons about journalism when he wrote a story for his high school newspaper that shook up the administration. That lesson about the power of the press was reinforced, at his first professional newspaper job, when he discovered a prominent community deacon was neglecting his tenants. He told the story to the community and then learned how to hang tight, even when criticism flowed his way.

Ephiphany photo

Pedro Rojas

Executive Editor, La Opinión
Los Angeles, CA

Out of curiosity Pedro Rojas says he decided to attend the immigration rally in Los Angeles on May 1, 2006. He encountered hundreds of thousands of people, filling the streets of L.A. Only one La Opinión reporter and two photographers s were assigned to attend, but six reporters and four photographers showed up on their own. The newspaper knocked out a pre-printed section and replaced it with the story of the event. Rojas was moved by his staff’s initiative. “It was a testament to what we do,” says Rojas.

Ephiphany photo

Rob Curley

Senior Editor, Digital, The Las Vegas Sun
Las Vegas, NV

Rob Curley was thrilled when a newspaper reader recognized him early in his career and asked him to talk. But he soon realized what concerned this reader was an issue he had not fully weighed in his concept of how the public engaged with his newspaper.

Ephiphany photo

Tom Gorman

Senior Editor, Print, The Las Vegas Sun
Las Vegas, NV

Tom Gorman was working at The Los Angeles Times when a melancholy assignment brought home his newspaper’s power. “Journalism touches a lot of people’ lives,” says Gorman, a lesson he re-learned when six teenagers died in an auto crash.

Ephiphany photo

Brian Greenspun

Publisher & Editor, The Las Vegas Sun
Las Vegas, NV

Brian Greenspun is reminded of the impact of his newspaper when new business owners come to Las Vegas and invariably visit the publishers of the city’s newspapers. He also sees his newspaper as a means for ordinary citizens to find a platform they might not otherwise attain. “People who have nowhere else to go,” says Greenspun.

Ephiphany photo

Tom Arviso Jr.

Publisher, The Navajo Times & CEO, Navajo Times Publishing Company
Window Rock, AZ

Tom Arviso, Jr. says, “The role of our newspaper was always questioned by our government.” Personal relationships also interfered. When Arviso’s friend, the Navajo Nation President, Albert Hale, misused tribal funds, Arviso had to make a tough call. But the facts his newspaper had verified persuaded him to publish the stories that drove Hale from office. And Arviso learned, “The truth always prevails.”

Ephiphany photo

Henry M. Lopez

Digital Development Manager & Project Manager, Santa Fe New Mexican
Santa Fe, NM

Henry M. Lopez was writing an obituary for The New Mexican when he was reminded of the power of the press in a grandmother’s kitchen in Santa Fe.

Ephiphany photo

Rob Dean

Managing Editor, Santa Fe New Mexican
Santa Fe, NM

Rob Dean used the power of his newspaper to focus public attention on an “achievement gap” in Santa Fe’s schools. The results were a clearer understanding of the issues at stake, a public forum, and some state legislation to begin to address this complicated problem.

BACK  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  NEXT



Warning: mysql_free_result() expects parameter 1 to be resource, null given in D:\Hosting\5439547\html\jepiphanies.php on line 339